On the 5th November, people across the UK celebrate Bonfire Night with food, friends and fireworks.

It is a well-loved tradition in the UK, but explaining this to our American colleagues was a tricky one: “we have this tradition because it’s the anniversary of an attempt to blow up the Houses of Parliament”. Sounds legit, right?

This was called the Gunpowder Plot, a plan in 1605 to blow up King James I and his government.

So, Guy Fawkes and his band of men put 36 barrels of gunpowder in cellars underneath the Houses of Parliament in London, ready to set off a massive explosion.

The plot was foiled, so now we all light bonfires and set off fireworks to remember this event.

We’ve compiled our favourite Bonfire Night recipes for cosy comfort food and snacks that are easy to prepare ahead, leaving you free to enjoy the fireworks.

Ingredients

  • 30g butter
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 finely sliced onions
  • 100ml dry cider
  • 1 tbsp dark brown soft sugar
  • 1 tbsp cider vinegar
  • 1 tbsp Dijon mustard
  • 2 tbsp mayonnaise
  • 4 sausages
  • 4 brioche hot dog buns

Tools

  • Tri-Ply Fry Pan (#CW7018)
  • Stainless Steel Mixing Bowl (#824)
  • Measuring Spoon Set (#722)

Sticky Cider Hot Dogs

  • Melt the butter in a pan with the olive oil.
  • Add the onions and a pinch of salt to a Tri-Ply Frying Pan (#CW7018) and fry for 25-30 mins or until caramelised.
  • Add the cider and simmer until reduced. Stir in the sugar and vinegar.
  • In a Stainless Steel Mixing Bowl (#824) mix the mustard with the mayonnaise.
  • Cook the sausages following pack instructions, then split the hot dog buns and fill each with a sausage.
  • Top with the onions and the mustard-mayo.

Ingredients

  • 8 Granny Smith apples
  • 400g golden caster sugar
  • 1 tsp vinegar
  • 4 tbsp golden syrup

Tools

Toffee Apples

  • Place the apples in a large mixing bowl (#826), then cover with boiling water. This removes the waxy coating and help the caramel to stick. Dry thoroughly and twist off any stalks then push a skewer (#906) into the stalk end of each apple.
  • Tip the sugar into a saucepan (#CW7002BK) along with 100ml water and set over a medium heat. Cook for 5 mins until the sugar dissolves, then stir in the vinegar and syrup.
  • Set a sugar thermometer in the pan and boil to 150C or ‘hard crack’ stage.
  • Working quickly and carefully, dip and twist each apple in the hot toffee until covered, let any excess drip away, then roll in sweets or sprinkles before placing on a tray (#913A) lined with parchment to harden.
  • Leave the toffee to cool before eating.
  • If making toffee seems too challenging – dunking in chocolate works just as well.

Ingredients

  • 200g salted butter, chopped
  • 85g light brown soft sugar
  • 85g treacle
  • 185g golden syrup
  • 250g self-raising flour
  • 2 tsp ground ginger
  • 1 tsp mixed spice
  • 100g porridge oats
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 tbsp milk
  • 2 balls stem ginger from a jar, chopped, plus 2 tbsp syrup from the jar, and extra to serve
  • Custard or ice cream, to serve (optional)

Tools

Ginger Skillet Parkin

  • Heat the oven to 150C.
  • Put a cast iron skillet (#CW30132) over a low heat and gently melt the butter, sugar, treacle and golden syrup together, stirring with a wooden spoon (#W12), until the butter is just melted and everything is combined. Remove from the heat and leave to cool slightly for 5-10 mins.
  • Sieve the flour and spices together using a mesh strainer (#94), then mix in the oats.
  • Whisk the eggs, milk, stem ginger and ginger syrup together in a Flexible Measuring Cup (#HSMC3).
  • Stir the dry ingredients into the cooled butter mixture until well combined.
  • Stir in the ginger, milk and egg mixture until you have a thick cake batter.
  • Transfer to the oven and bake for 45-50 mins until firm and risen.
  • Serve scooped from the pan with extra ginger syrup and custard or ice cream, or leave to cool and eat cold.
ginger parkin in skillet pan

“Remember, remember the Fifth of November, gunpowder, treason and plot”

Rebecca Redden

Author Rebecca Redden

More posts by Rebecca Redden

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